Women are out-earning men in corporate finance

23 Dec 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Women are getting paid more in corporate America — possibly because there are fewer of them.

Compensation for female chief financial officers at S&P 500 companies last year outpaced that of their male counterparts, according to an analysis by executive compensation firm Equilar and the Associated Press.

Companies and shareholders became more focused on financial security and regulation after the financial crisis, and corporate finance began to play a bigger role in company strategy, according to Gregg Passin, a compensation expert at consulting firm Mercer. Investors have warmly welcomed her arrival at Google, where she is expected to bring some financial discipline to what some consider their free-spending ways.

Indra Nooyi, CEO of PepsiCo and Lynn Good, CEO of Duke Energy are both former CFOs. “It’s a unique position that has the ability to contribute to day-to-day operations but also on long-term strategic planning,” Good said. The other top-paid female CFOs, after Porat, include Marianne Lake of JPMorgan Chase, whose compensation package is valued at $9.1 million, Catherine Lesjak of Hewlett-Packard at $8 million, Sharon McCollam at Best Buy at $7 million and Robin Washington of Gilead Sciences at $6.2 million.

To determine what stock and option awards are worth, Equilar uses the value of an award on the day it is granted, as shown in a company’s proxy statement.

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